Can Autistic People Be Smart

Can Autistic People Be Smart?

Can autistic people be smart? Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or Autism is a developmental problem brought on by variations in the brain.

It covers a wide spectrum of disorders marked by difficulties with speech, nonverbal communication, repetitive activities, and social skills.

Here is a related article that might intrest you on Are Autistic Brains Different From Normal Brains?

Can Autistic People Be Smart? Does Learning Help? 

Autistic People Be Smart

There are numerous varieties of Autism rather than just one, with the majority being influenced by a mix of genetic and environmental variables. As Autism is a spectrum disorder, each autistic individual has unique abilities and difficulties. 

People with Autism can learn, reason, and solve problems in various ways, from highly skilled to severely impaired. While some persons with ASD could need a lot of everyday assistance, others might only need a little help and, in some circumstances, could even live independently.

Autism Related Social And Communication Challenges:

People with Autism tend to shy away from or break eye contact when speaking. By the age of nine months, they also do not respond to their name and do not exhibit any facial expressions of happiness, sadness, anger, or surprise. 

Additionally, they constantly repeat words or phrases, play with toys in the same manner, and become unhappy if the arrangement of their possessions is altered. They also exhibit delayed cognitive or learning abilities. 

Also, they show atypical mood or emotional responses and constantly struggle with anxiety, tension, or excessive worry. The mentioned problems may differ depending on the patient’s IQ, even if the behavioral issues shared by all ASD patients tend to fall into the same categories, such as communication difficulties, difficulty interacting with others, and repetitive activities.

Can Autistic People Learn The Right Mental Capacity? 

Can Autistic People Learn The Right Mental Capacity 

There have long been hypotheses concerning fundamental relationships between IQ and Autism. There is a good genetic association between the risk of Autism and measures of mental capacity, according to recent studies. 

These results suggest a substantial overlap between the genes for Autism and the alleles for high IQ, which is contradictory given that the average IQ of people with Autism is below average. 

Also, some of the commonly used intelligence tests don’t accurately reflect what the autistic mind is capable of.

Some intelligent people won’t even be aware they have Autism because intelligence lessens some signs of this disability. 

Cambridge University conducted research a few years ago to investigate the idea of the autistic genius. The study, which included data on almost 500,000 individuals, found surprising evidence that those who work in fields like technology, science, engineering, etc., traditionally requiring a lot of brainpower are more likely to have autistic symptoms. 

Evidence suggests that many convergent correlates, including rapid brain growth and huge brain size, link autism and high IQ. 

Additionally, it involves better synapse performance, sharper attention, high socioeconomic standing, deliberate decision-making, etc. The study also found that those with genetic variations linked to Autism had somewhat higher average test scores than those without. Many autistic people or people with autistic genes have ordinary to above-average intelligence, according to research.

High intelligence, however, does not imply that a person is immune to social issues. High-functioning individuals on the autism spectrum struggle with communication and social engagement, just like everyone else. 

They could have difficulty making friends as they cannot understand the social interaction. A social situation can cause them so much stress that they withdraw. They don’t engage in much small talk or eye contact. But, despite all this, they have a high IQ. 

How The Brain’s Structure May Differ In People With Autism, Leading To Intelligence?

Numerous variations in activity throughout the regions of the brain frequently used for social communication and repetitive behaviors are discovered in MRI studies comparing the brains of ASD patients to non-autistic groups. 

These regions appear to be used differently in autistic geniuses to execute various acts of brilliance.

More and more studies are demonstrating that ASD patients are, in both regards, closer to the normal range than was previously believed.

The foundation of the functional behavior assessments (FBAs) that applied behavior analysts use to assess behavior deficits and establish treatment plans is dealing with each patient individually, with their strengths and shortcomings. The right therapies may eventually reveal and aid in developing the underlying intellect of ASD patients.